Asian

Thai BBQ Steak

Amazing Thai BBQ Steak, ready to serve!

D.Schmidt

You and your family as well as guests will rave over this Thai BBQ steak, and it also happens to be easy to make. Just stir together the simple marinade mixture, massage into the steak, and marinade as long as possible (up to 24 hours). The marinade is Thai in origin with influence from the Chinese-Thai sector. The steak is normally sliced up and served over salad, but this dish is so good, you’ll probably want it eat the traditional way, with your choice of rice or potatoes and vegetables/salad. My husband has tested and re-tested this recipe, and declares it his absolute favorite. I hope it will also become yours.

Prep Time: 12 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 27 minutes

Yield: SERVES 2

Ingredients:

  • 2 beef steaks, your choice of cut, any size, fat left on
  • MARINADE:
  • 4 Tbsp. hoisin sauce
  • 4 Tbsp. soy sauce
  • 3 Tbsp. fish sauce
  • 2 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
  • 2 heaping tsp. brown sugar OR tradional Asian palm sugar
  • 1/2 to 1 tsp. chili flakes (dried crushed chili), or more to taste (for those with sensitive stomachs, this can be reduced to just a pinch)

Preparation:

  1. Combine all ‘Marinade’ ingredients together in a large cup. Stir well to dissolve sugar.
  2. Place steaks on a large enough plate or dish for marinating. Do not remove fat, as this helps flavor the meat and hold in the juices. Pour marinade over and gently ‘massage’ into the meat with your fingers. Ensure all sides of the steak are well covered, then cover and set in the refrigerator to marinate at least a few hours, preferably longer (24 hours is the best).
  3. To cook, place steak on a forty-five degree angle over a hot grill. Cook 1 minute to sear juices in, then flip over, turning steaks the opposite angle this time (for nice grill marks). Cook 1 more minute. Then continue cooking and flipping, spooning over all the leftover marinade from the marinating plate/dish. Continue grilling steak until to your desired ‘doneness’.
  4. Transfer cooked steaks onto individual plates, allowing them to cool 5 minutes before eating. Serve with your choice of rice, potatoes, and/or salad, and ENJOY!

Recommended Side Dishes: The following side dishes marry beautifully with this steak: Easy Saffron Rice, Simple White Thai Jasmine Rice, Easy Thai Cucumber Salad, Easy Thai Tossed Green Salad.

Other Ways of Using this Special Marinade:
My husband and I love this marinade so much, we have used it on grilled pork and chicken, grilled shrimp (with and without the shell), and to make BBQ chicken wings. Another method is to cut up beef or chicken pieces into small cubes or strips, marinate in the special marinade, then skewer and cook over a hot grill. This makes for an easy satay dish without going to all the work of traditional Thai Satay.

Kung Pao Chicken

Epicurious  | July 2013

by Diana Kuan

The Chinese Takeout Cookbook

Kung Pao Chicken recipe

photo by Diana Kuan

yield
Serves 4 as part of a multicourse meal

This highly addictive stir-fried chicken continues to be one of the most popular Chinese dishes in America as the succulent, complex sauce of salty, sweet, sour, and spicy flavors is hard to pass up. For years Americanized versions often left out the Sichuan peppercorns because of an import ban, but now Sichuan peppercorns are once again easily found in Chinatown shops and even gourmet chains such as Whole Foods.

Ingredients

Marinade

  • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons Chinese rice wine or dry sherry
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 pound boneless, skinless, chicken breasts or thighs, cut into 1-inch cubes

Sauce

  • 1 tablespoon Chinese black vinegar, or substitute good-quality balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon hoisin sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 2 teaspoons sugar
  • 1 teaspoon cornstarch
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground Sichuan pepper
  • 2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil
  • 8 to 10 dried red chilies
  • 3 scallions, white and green parts separated, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon minced or grated fresh ginger
  • 1/4 cup unsalted dry-roasted peanuts

Preparation

1. Marinate the chicken: In a medium bowl, stir together the soy sauce, rice wine, and cornstarch until the cornstarch is dissolved. Add the chicken and stir gently to coat. Let stand at room temperature for 10 minutes.

2. Prepare the sauce: In another bowl, combine the black vinegar, soy sauce, hoisin sauce, sesame oil, sugar, cornstarch, and Sichuan pepper. Stir until the sugar and cornstarch are dissolved and set aside.

3. You may need to turn on your stove’s exhaust fan, because stir-frying dried chilies on high heat can get a little smoky. Heat a wok or large skillet over high heat until a bead of water sizzles and evaporates on contact. Add the peanut oil and swirl to coat the base. Add the chilies and stir-fry for about 30 seconds, or until the chilies have just begun to blacken and the oil is slightly fragrant. Add the chicken and stir-fry until no longer pink, 2 to 3 minutes.

4. Add the scallion whites, garlic, and ginger and stir-fry for about 30 seconds. Pour in the sauce and mix to coat the other ingredients. Stir in the peanuts and cook for another 1 to 2 minutes. Transfer to a serving plate, sprinkle the scallion greens on top, and serve.

Chinese Orange Chicken

Epicurious  | May 2013

by Genevieve Ko

Chinese Orange Chicken recipe

photo by Lara Ferroni

yield
Makes 4 servings

active time
35 minutes

total time
35 minutes

Orange chicken is a Chinese-restaurant favorite for good reason. Think of it as a Chinese-American version of fried chicken nuggets coated in a savory citrus sauce punctuated with a light touch of chile heat. What’s not to love? Making it at home—instead of resorting to takeout—is much easier than you might think, and probably involves about as much time as it takes to find the menu online and wait, wait, wait for the delivery. And we guarantee you will be bowled over by the layers of flavor and texture!

For more about orange chicken, including tips on frying and making the sauce, see Takeout At Home: Chinese Orange Chicken.

Ingredients

For the chicken:

  • 1 pound boneless, skinless chicken thighs, patted dry and cut into 1 1/2-inch pieces
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese Shaoxing wine or dry sherry
  • 1/2 cup cornstarch
  • About 2 cups canola oil for frying

For the orange sauce:

  • 2 oranges
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh ginger (from 1-inch piece)
  • 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 tablespoon low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon Chinese Shaoxing wine or dry sherry
  • 1 teaspoon rice vinegar (not seasoned) or cider vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • Thinly sliced scallion greens, for garnish
  • Thinly sliced fresh red chile, for garnish (optional)
  • Cooked rice for serving
  • Equipment: 10-inch cast-iron skillet or other high-sided skillet (at least 2 inches deep), deep-fry thermometer, Microplane (for optional garnish)

Preparation

Start the chicken:
In a shallow, medium bowl toss the chicken pieces with the soy sauce and wine. Let stand while you make the sauce.

Make the orange sauce:
Using a vegetable peeler, remove 4 lengthwise strips of zest from 1 orange—each strip should be about 3/4 inch wide and 3 1/2 to 4 inches long. Arrange the zest in one layer between paper towels and microwave on high in 20-second increments until dry and brittle but not browned, 60 to 80 seconds total. Let the zest cool then finely chop it. If desired, use a Microplane to remove some of the remaining zest from the orange and reserve it for garnish. (If desired, zest the second orange for additional garnish.)

Squeeze enough juice from both oranges to measure 1/2 cup. In a small bowl, whisk together the juice and 2 teaspoons cornstarch until the cornstarch is dissolved.

In a 10-inch skillet, heat 1 tablespoon oil over moderate heat until hot but not smoking. Add the garlic, ginger, crushed red pepper, and dried orange zest and stir-fry until golden, about 30 seconds. Add the soy sauce, wine, vinegar, and sugar and stir until the sugar dissolves, about 5 seconds. Stir the orange juice–cornstarch mixture then add it to the skillet. Bring the sauce to a boil, stirring, then reduce the heat to low and simmer, uncovered, for 1 minute. Remove the skillet from the heat and set it aside while you fry the chicken.

Fry the chicken:
Line a large rimmed baking sheet with paper towels.

In a 10-inch cast-iron skillet, heat 1/2 inch of oil until a deep-fry thermometer registers 365°F. Meanwhile, coat half of the chicken, a couple pieces at a time, in cornstarch, making sure they are well coated and gently knocking off any excess, then transfer to a plate. Carefully add all the coated chicken to the hot oil, spacing the pieces apart from each other. Fry the chicken, turning it once or twice, until deep golden, about 5 minutes. While frying, adjust the heat as necessary to keep the oil at 365°F. Using a metal spider or a slotted spoon, transfer the chicken as done to the paper-towel-lined baking sheet. Continue to coat and fry the remaining chicken in the same manner, returning the oil to 365°F between batches.

Once the chicken is fried, place the skillet of reserved orange sauce over moderately low heat and bring it to a simmer, stirring and thinning the sauce with a little water if necessary. Add the chicken, and stir until thoroughly coated in sauce.

To serve:
Transfer the chicken to a serving dish and garnish with the scallions, and, if desired, the red chile slices and the freshly grated orange zest. Serve immediately with rice.

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